Microsoft products – consolidated table of end of life dates

Microsoft product end of support dates are sometimes not easy to find and its not getting any better with the “current branch” releases and cloud solutions being governed by the Modern lifecycle policy.

The Modern lifecycle policy page further links to 3 product catagories, O365, Cloud platform and Dynamics. Unfortunately, its not clear (at least to me) how this helps with products such as SCCM current branch (be it 1606, 1702, 1706, 1710 or 1802) – however this information is available at another location

Likewise with the “traditional” products, most end of life information is available here – but to say that the information is difficult to search through is an understatement.

It also sometimes lacks detail, for example, there is no metion of the differing support for Windows 8.1 without update 1 and with update 1.

We have a number of clients that take the approach that while a server is running, to leave it there – and while I may personally not like this approach (i prefer to roll through the OS upgrades as they come out) – they have a valid approach and end of life information is important for them.

Keep in mind that everything listed below is end of extended support, not mainstream support – and i have taken some liberties (e.g. assumed that windows 8.1 is 8.1 with update 1)

Windows 10 dates have been sourced from the product lifecycle page, however this blog entry states than an additional 6 months has been granted to displayed Windows 10 versions.

If you find the below useful – cool. If i’ve got something wrong, or missed something that is key (in your opinion), please leave a comment.

 

ProductEnd of life date (end of extended support)
Windows 2003 SP2July 14, 2015
Windows 2008July 12, 2011
Windows 2008 R2 SP1Jan 14, 2020
Windows 2012Oct 10, 2023
Windows 2012 R2Oct 10, 2023
Windows 2016Jan 11, 2027
Windows XP SP3Jan 11, 2011
Windows Vista SP2April 4, 2017
Windows 7 SP1Jan 14, 2020
Windows 8Jan 12, 2016
Windows 8.1 with update 1Jan 10, 2023
Windows 10 RTM (1507)May 9, 2017
Windows 10 1511Oct 10, 2017 (End of support)
April 10, 2018 (additional servicing for enterprise and education)
Windows 10 1607April 10, 2018 (End of support)
Oct 9, 2018 (additional servicing for enterprise and education)
Windows 10 1703Oct 9, 2018 (end of support)
April 9, 2018 (additional servicing for enterprise and education)
Windows 10 1709April 9, 2019 (End of support)
Oct 8, 2019 (additional servicing for enterprise and education)
Office 2007Oct 10, 2017
Office 2010 SP2Oct 13, 2020
Office 2013April 11, 2023
Office 2016Oct 14, 2025
Lync 2010April 13, 2021
Lync 2013April 11, 2023
Skype for Business 2015April 11, 2023
Exchange 2010 SP3Jan 14, 2020
Exchange 2013 SP1April 11, 2023
Exchange 2016Oct 14, 2025
Forefront TMGJuly 12, 2011
Sharepoint 2010July 10, 2012
Sharepoint 2013 SP1April 11, 2023
Sharepoint 2016July 14, 2026
SCCM 2012 SP2July 12, 2022
SCCM 2012 R2 SP1July 12, 2022
SCCM 1606July 22, 2017
SCCM 1610Nov 18, 2017
SCCM 1702March 27, 2018
SCCM 1706July 31, 2018
SCCM 1710May 20, 2019
SCCM 1802Sept 22, 2019
SCVMM 2012 SP1July 12, 2022
SCVMM 2016Jan 11, 2027
SCOM 2012 SP1July 12, 2022
SCOM 2012 R2July 12, 2022
SCOM 2016Jan 11, 2027
SCORCH 2012 SP1July 12, 2022
SCORCH 2012 R2July 12, 2022
SCORCH 2016Jan 11, 2027
SCSM 2016Jan 11, 2027

KB4038777 fails on some Windows 2008 R2 servers

Recently, we had an issue where KB4038777 was failing to install on some Windows 2008 R2 servers, but was fine on others.

Sometimes, this indicates that the “maximum run time” on a patch has been set ludicrously low (generally 10 minutes) on a specific patch – and the servers that it is failing on, are those that don’t perform so well – and therefore time out.

In this case, the patch was failing with the following line in the CBS.log

Failed to find file: x86_microsoft-windows-directwrite_31bf3856ad364e35_7.1.7601.23688_none_c657164201eacd8d\DWrite.dll [HRESULT = 0x80070002 – ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND]

We tried a number of things to “fix” this, including comparing file versions of Dwrite.dll, cleaning out the softwaredistribution cache, disabling AV etc – to no avail.

After a few hours, we found that installing the “desktop experience” feature (which requires a reboot), then running a disk cleanup (including windows updates) on the server then allowed us to install this update.

Its not an ideal “solution” – and quite frankly – all Windows 2008 R2 server should be in the process of being decommissioned… but aside from that, it seems that admins have the option of

a) installing desktop experience, rebooting, then running a disk cleanup

b) waiting for next months rollup – which may not have the same issue.

 

SMB 1 no longer installed by default in Win 10 1710/Server 2016 (next release)

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4034314/smbv1-is-not-installed-by-default-in-windows-10-rs3-and-windows-server

As per the link above, SMB 1 will no longer be installed by default in Win 10 1710 (which, given the release date, I’m guess that’s what it will be called) or the next version of Server 2016 (whatever that ends up being called).

Considering the recent-ish SMB1 targeted attacks, this isn’t surprising – and is a good move in my opinion. Issue is of course, the companies likely to hit by SMB1 (or other old-school attacks) are likely to not be up to date with their patching and even less likely to be up to date with OS versions – so it wont help secure the more vulnerable networks out there….

Welcome aboard Jamie Brooks

We are proud to introduce the newest addition to the Adexis team of senior consultants, Jamie Brooks.

We’ve known for some years of Jamie’s outstanding reputation for quality and technical skill and we are honoured to have him onboard.

Jamie brings to Adexis a new set of talents including expert skills in Microsoft Azure. This is an exciting addition which expands the cloud and hybrid services and solutions we can bring to our clients.

Jamie also brings with him extensive skills in our existing engagements with our customers such as SCCM, AD, Exchange and more.

I would like to thank our customers who continue to support us, making this increase in our team possible.

Welcome aboard Jamie, we are proud to have you onboard and look forward to achieving great things together.

SCCM – BADMIF error 4

It is very common to get the following errors in your SCCM component status window for the component “SMS_Inventory_Data_loader” – the most of common of which goes something along the lines of

Inventory Data Loader failed to process the file D:\Program Files\Microsoft Configuration Manager\inboxes\auth\dataldr.box\Process\H38H6C71.MIF because it is larger than the defined maximum allowable size of 5000000.

The size of the MIFs can be checked by navigating to D:\Program Files\Microsoft Configuration Manager\inboxes\auth\dataldr.box\BADMIFS\ExceedSizeLimit and taking note of the largest MIF, then adding a bit of headroom, modifying the registry as per https://thedesktopteam.com/heinrich/event-id-2719-sms_inventory_data_loader-error-sccm-2012-r2/

For one client recently, once that was done, the larger MIFs started processing, however they then got many entry’s in D:\Program Files\Microsoft Configuration Manager\inboxes\auth\dataldr.box\BADMIFS\ErrorCode_4

This article – https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/umairkhan/2014/10/01/configmgr-2012-hardware-inventory-resync-and-badmif-internals/ nicely documents some of the errors you may get, but not specifically what error code 4 relates to. This TechNet forum post seems to nail the issue, but not necessarily how to solve it.

In my case, I navigated to the SCCM logs directory, open dataldr.log and searched for errors to find the specific line of SQL which was not being imported nicely – it was pretty easy to find thanks to CMTrace’s desire to highlight lines with “error” in them to red.

With this, its fairly easy to see that the troublesome statement is

*** [23000][547][Microsoft][SQL Server Native Client 11.0][SQL Server]The INSERT statement conflicted with the FOREIGN KEY constraint “WINDOWS8_APPLICATION_USER_INFO_DATA_FK”. The conflict occurred in database “CM_xxx”, table “dbo.System_DATA”, column ‘MachineID’. : pWINDOWS8_APPLICATION_USER_INFO_DATA

 

Armed with this information, you can then choose if you care about this hardware inventory information – and if not, you can exclude it from inventory.