Exchange hybrid – mailboxes missing on-premise

While hybrid exchange environments are awesome for stretching your on premise exchange topology to Office 365, they do introduce a bunch of complexity – primarily around user creation, licensing, and mail flow.

I recently had an issue at a client where they had email bounce-backs from an on premise service destined for a few Exchange Online mailboxes. For some reason, these few mailboxes didn’t appear in the on-premise exchange environment (as remote Office 365 mailboxes), so exchange was unable to route the emails destined for those particular mailboxes.

In general, you should be creating your mailboxes on premise (Enable-RemoteMailbox), then synchronising via AADConnect – that way the on premise environment knows about the mailbox and it can be managed properly. This client was actually doing this, but obviously the process broke somewhere along the way for a few mailboxes.

There’s a bunch of different options on Google about how to get the mailbox to show up on premise – with a lot of them recommending to remove the mailbox and start again (er… how about no!).

I came across this Microsoft article on a very similar issue, but for Shared Mailboxes created purely in Exchange Online. Looking at the process, it looked like a modified version may work for user mailboxes – and it does. Below is a quick and dirty powershell script that can be used to fix a single mailbox:

 

Azure AD Connect – Permissions Issues

I’ve had various versions of AD Sync/Azure AD Connect running in my development environment over the years, and have used a number of different service accounts when testing out different configurations or new features. Needless to say, the permissions for my Sync account were probably a bit of a mess.

Recently, I wanted to try out group writeback. It’s been a preview feature of Azure AD Connect for quite a while now – it allows you to synchronise Exchange Online groups back to your AD environment so that on premise users can send and receive emails from these groups.

Launched the AADConnect configuration, enabled Group Writeback, then kicked off a sync. Of course, I start getting ‘Access Denied’ errors for each of the Exchange Online groups – couldn’t be that easy!

Generally speaking, you need to also run one of the “Initialize-<something>Writeback” commands. When I went looking for the appropriate commands (as I don’t remember these things off the top of my head!), I came across an interesting TechNet Blog article: Advanced AAD Connect Permissions Configuration – it’s pretty much a comprehensive script that handles all the relevant permissions (including locating the configured sync account and sync OUs).

Gave it a whirl, entered credentials as required, and what do you know – permissions all now good!

Microsoft Exchange Federation Certificates – Keep an eye on the expiry!

I recently had a client experience an issue with their hybrid exchange setup (365/On Premise) – users were suddenly unable to retrieve free/busy and calendar information between the two environments. As it turns out, the certificate used to secure communications to the Microsoft Federation Gateway (MFG) had expired.

Federation certificates within exchange are generally created as part of the federation creation wizard (or the 365 Hybrid Configuration Wizard) – so in most cases, people don’t realise they’ve been created. If you’re not actively monitoring certificate expiry dates on your servers (which you should be!), you may get into the situation where this certificate expires – which results in the federation no longer working.

Why is it important to renew it before it expires? Because if you don’t, you need to remove and re-create the federation – a significantly larger task than the federation certificate renewal process. The reason for needing to re-create the trust is due to the fact that the federation certificate is used to authenticate any changes to the federation – so once it expires you can’t make any changes and have to start from scratch. Lets take a look at the steps involved in both:

Renewing before expiry:

  1. Create a new self-signed federation certificate
  2. Set the new certificate as the ‘Next’ certificate in the federation trust
  3. Wait for AD replication
  4. Test the certificate and trust (Test-FederationTrustCertificate, Test-FederationTrust)
  5. Roll-over the ‘Current’ certificate to the ‘Next’ certificate
  6. Refresh the federation metadata

Renewing after expiry:

  1. Document the existing trust settings (federated domains, federation settings)
  2. Force remove each federated domain from the federation
  3. Remove the federation trust
  4. Wait for AD replication
  5. Create a new self-signed federation certificate
  6. Create a new federation trust
  7. Update the trust organisation information
  8. Configure the required settings in the trust (as per the documentation you created in step 1)
  9. Wait for AD replication
  10. Test the certificate and trust (Test-FederationTrustCertificate, Test-FederationTrust) – it can take 12-48 hours before the trust reports as being no longer expired!
  11. Add each of the federated domains back into the trust (this will involve generating domain ‘Proof’ entries and adding them to your external DNS, then waiting for DNS propagation)

So in short, don’t let your federation certificates expire!

Scripting Office 365 licensing with disabled services

In the past I’ve had a few clients request scripts to automatically set/assign licenses to users in Office 365 – Generally pretty simple stuff. Recently I had a client ask to disable a particular service within a license – again, not all that difficult – unless you want to actually check if a license/service is already configured correctly (and not make any changes if it is). Took a little while to work out, so figured I’d share the love!

Just to set a license for a user is a pretty simple process – all you need is the license ‘SkuId’ value of the relevant license. To get a list of the ones available in your tenant, run: Get-MsolAccountSku You’ll get a list of the available license SkuId’s and how many are active/consumed. In this article we’ll use an example SkuId of Contoso:STANDARDWOFFPACK_IW_STUDENT. Once you have the SkuId, all you need to run to assign the license is:

You’ll notice that the code above sets the location first – this is required, as you can’t apply a license without a location being set! What if you didn’t want to have all the applications available for the user? For example, the above license includes Yammer Education. In this case, we need to create a ‘License Options’ object first.

 So where did we get the “YAMMER_EDU” from? You can list the available services for a license by running:

What if we wanted to disable multiple services in the License Option? The “-DisabledPlans” option accepts a comma-separated list. For example:

Ok, so now we know how to get the available licenses and related services – as well as how to assign the license to the user. What if we wanted to check if a license is assigned to a user first? Personally, I’m not a huge fan of just re-stamping settings each time you run a script – so I thought I’d look into it. The easiest method I’ve found is to try bind to the license, then check if it’s $null or not:

From there we can do whatever we want – if the license is found and that’s all you care about, you can skip – otherwise you can use the other commands to set the license.
So what if we also want to make sure YAMMER_EDU is disabled as well? That’s a little trickier. First we need to bind to the license like we did above, then we need to check the status of the relevant ‘ServicePlan’.

At this point it’s probably a good idea to talk about the structure of these objects – you may not need to know it, but for anyone trying to modify these commands it might be helpful:

  • A ‘User’ object contains an attribute ‘Licenses’. This attribute is an array – as a user can have multiple licenses assigned.
  • A ‘License’ object contains two attributes relevant to this script; ‘AccountSkuID’ and ‘ServiceStatus’
    • AccountSkuId is the attribute that matches up with the AccountSkuId we’re using above
    • ServiceStatus is another array – it contains an array of objects representing the individual services available in that license – and their status.

The two attributes attached to a ‘ServiceStatus’ object that we care about are:

  • ServicePlan.ServiceName – this is the name to match the service above (eg: YAMMER_EDU)
  • ProvisioningStatus – this can be a bunch of values, but mostly ‘Success’, ‘Disabled’ or ‘PendingInput’. I’d assume there’s also ‘Provisioning’, but I’ve never seen it.

With this in mind, we can put together a script like the following – it reads the UPN and AccountSkuID from a CSV file, though you could use whatever source you like and update the script accordingly.

Note: In order to run this script, you’ll need:

 

Automating Mailbox Regional Settings in Exchange Online

When you migrate (or create) a mailbox in Exchange Online, the first time a user goes to open their mailbox they are prompted to select their Timezone and Language. I recently had a client ask for a more automated method of pre-populating these values, so thought I’d have a look into it.

Of course, there’s no global way to define these settings for users before they get a mailbox, so the settings have to be set once the mailbox has been migrated – this really only leaves the option of a custom powershell script – either something you run after each migration (or creation), or on a periodic schedule.

First, to the settings themselves. As it turns out, you can use the same commands that you’d use in on premise Exchange: Get-MailboxRegionalConfiguration and Set-MailboxRegionalConfiguration – which also means this script could be adapted to be used on premise as well. The two settings we’re concerned with here are “Language” and “TimeZone”. Since the client we’re dealing with here is solely based in Australia, we’re going to be setting all users to a language of “en-AU”. For the TimeZone, Microsoft provide a list of valid values here: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2779520

Except that they’re missing two Australian time zones. The actual valid values for Australia are:

  • AUS Central Standard Time – Darwin
  • Cen. Australia Standard Time – Adelaide
  • AUS Eastern Standard Time – Canberra, Melbourne, Sydney
  • E. Australia Standard Time – Brisbane
  • Tasmania Standard Time – Hobart

So with that in mind, we can use the following commands:

Since we’re talking about a national business with users in different time zones, the time zone value is going to need to change for each user. In order to automate this, we’ll need some source information available that indicates in which state the user is located – ideally, you’re going to be using the ‘Office’ field in the user’s AD account – though obviously you could use any available attribute. The reason I recommend ‘Office’ (or ‘physicalDeliveryOfficeName’) is because it’s synchronised to Office 365 with the user account (and becomes ‘Office’).

Note: You don’t actually need the value in Office 365 – if you’re running the script on premise, you can query your AD directly and ignore the attributes in 365. When I wrote the script I opted to solely use data that was in Office 365 – primarily because I was developing the script remotely and didn’t have direct access to their AD – so if you want to use your local AD instead of values in 365, you’ll need to modify the script!

For this client, the ‘Office’ value for each user is prefixed with the state (ie: SA, NSW, QLD, WA) – so it was relatively simple to use a ‘Switch’ function in Powershell (similar to a ‘Case’ statement in vbscript).

In order to use the script, you need the following:

You’ll also need to update the 5 variables at the top of the script (paths, etc), as well as the Time Zones (and criteria) in the Switch statement.